eastiseverywhere

eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  

British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  

Cleveland Museum of Art

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  

The Frick Collection, New York 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

The Emperor Timur Enthroned,

India (1654-56)

Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  

Musée du Louvre, Paris

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 

India (1654-56)

Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh

India (1654-1656)

Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

[x]

mughalshit

mughalshit:

Mohur of Shah Jahan

India (Allahabad), Mughal, c. 1635 - 1636

Gold

The David Collection, Copenhagen

Obverse: The central square reads, “There is no god but God, and Muhammad is his messenger.”

Surrounding this box, the names of the Four “Rightly Guided” caliphs and their epithets are listed. “by the sincerety of Abu Bakr, the justice of ‘Umar, the modesty of ‘Uthman and the wisdom of ‘Ali 1045”

Reverse: The central square reads, “Shah Jahan monarch warrior”

Surrounding this box is, “Bright Star of the Faith, Muhammad, Second Lord of the Auspicious Conjunction, struck Ilahabad”

As a side note, each of these mohurs weigh 10.92 g, which in modern USD is about $447.

I added the modern USD value because often in transcripts and documents it will be said that an individual spent so many mohurs on a banquet, feast or celebration, and to illustrate just how costly and lavish they were.

mughalshit
mughalshit:

Diwan-i-Khas at Agra Fort, the River Jamuna, and The Taj Mahal
India, East India Company, 1860
Photograph by Shepherd and Robertson

Photograph of Agra with the Palace in Fort, the Taj Mahal and river in the distance.The Diwan-i-Khas and Taj Mahal were built by Shah Jahan (1592-1666), the Mughal Emperor who ruled with supreme power, confidence and glory in an era which witnessed an unparalleled flowering of art and culture. The Diwan-i-Khas served as a Hall of Private Audience but was also a royal treasure chamber. There were three treasuries, one for gold (muhrs) and silver (rupees), one for gems and jewels and one for copper (dams). Ultimately, the Emperor’s profligacy led to his downfall and he was quickly deposed by his son who deplored his father’s lavishness.

mughalshit:

Diwan-i-Khas at Agra Fort, the River Jamuna, and The Taj Mahal

India, East India Company, 1860

Photograph by Shepherd and Robertson

Photograph of Agra with the Palace in Fort, the Taj Mahal and river in the distance.The Diwan-i-Khas and Taj Mahal were built by Shah Jahan (1592-1666), the Mughal Emperor who ruled with supreme power, confidence and glory in an era which witnessed an unparalleled flowering of art and culture. The Diwan-i-Khas served as a Hall of Private Audience but was also a royal treasure chamber. There were three treasuries, one for gold (muhrs) and silver (rupees), one for gems and jewels and one for copper (dams). Ultimately, the Emperor’s profligacy led to his downfall and he was quickly deposed by his son who deplored his father’s lavishness.

Anonymous asked:

I was wondering if you could please rec any books or other resources relating to everyday life during the mughal empire/era? I was particularly interested in the 1500s-1600s. thank you!

The Mughal World: Life in India’s Last Golden Age by Abraham Eraly is so amazingly written and comprehensive. Also, for those of you who are really keen on details, Private Life of the Mughals of India by R. Nath is an interesting read.

mughalshit
mughalshit:

Portrait Miniature of an Indian Courtesan
India (Delhi), Mughal, c. 1830 - 1850
Watercolors on ivory, gold, and glass.

English artists visited India to paint both large-scale and miniature portraits of those serving abroad as mementos for friends and families back in the Mother Country. They introduced the European technique of painting in watercolors on ivory to the local artists. In this instance, an artist from Delhi has portrayed a courtesan dressed as a princess wearing elaborate Mughal gold and gem-set jewelry. 

Courtesans in India have a long history, recorded as far as 2,000 years ago. They may have reached their pinnacle during the decline of the Mughal court, in the mid-18th century. Contrary to popular belief, courtesans were highly educated women, taught from a young age in not just song and dance, but in poetry, literature, and politics. Some rose to very high positions, like Begum Samru, who led her troops into battle. For more information and some interesting insight in the evolution of the classical tawaif to the modern era, here's an article from a newsletter published by the Indian Institute of Advanced Study. Here's another published by the Tribune India.

mughalshit:

Portrait Miniature of an Indian Courtesan

India (Delhi), Mughal, c. 1830 - 1850

Watercolors on ivory, gold, and glass.

English artists visited India to paint both large-scale and miniature portraits of those serving abroad as mementos for friends and families back in the Mother Country. They introduced the European technique of painting in watercolors on ivory to the local artists. In this instance, an artist from Delhi has portrayed a courtesan dressed as a princess wearing elaborate Mughal gold and gem-set jewelry.

Courtesans in India have a long history, recorded as far as 2,000 years ago. They may have reached their pinnacle during the decline of the Mughal court, in the mid-18th century. Contrary to popular belief, courtesans were highly educated women, taught from a young age in not just song and dance, but in poetry, literature, and politics. Some rose to very high positions, like Begum Samru, who led her troops into battle. For more information and some interesting insight in the evolution of the classical tawaif to the modern era, here's an article from a newsletter published by the Indian Institute of Advanced Study. Here's another published by the Tribune India.

Anonymous asked:

We can see that you use a lot photos from the webpage of the David Collection. We would appreciate very much if you would write that the objects belong to "The David Collection, Copenhagen" or perhaps link directly to the objects on our webpage - as you have done with the miniature "Sita Shies Away from Hanuma".. Sincerely your, Mette Korsholm, registrar, The David Collection, Copenhagen.

Yes, I can most certainly do this. Please allow some time for me to go through my archive so that I can find the posts that used images and information from your museum. Also, know I always cite directly to the item, so if you click on the “source” link, it will take you straight to the page. I do this with all of my posts.