mughalshit
mughalshit:

A Lady with Flower and Fly Whisk
India, Mughal, c. 1630

A specific genre that the Mughal artists developed to perfection in the 17th century was portraiture. There is an entire gallery of true-to-life depictions of men, from the Great Mughals themselves to their ministers and courtiers. Women were a different matter. Artists naturally did not have access to Muslim harems, and the many depictions of women in Mughal miniatures are consequently idealized.
This sensual rendition must thus be considered a personification of the period’s ideal of beauty. The clinging or partly transparent garments give us more than an intimation of the sweetness that could be found in the closed world of the harem.

mughalshit:

A Lady with Flower and Fly Whisk

India, Mughal, c. 1630

A specific genre that the Mughal artists developed to perfection in the 17th century was portraiture. There is an entire gallery of true-to-life depictions of men, from the Great Mughals themselves to their ministers and courtiers. Women were a different matter. Artists naturally did not have access to Muslim harems, and the many depictions of women in Mughal miniatures are consequently idealized.

This sensual rendition must thus be considered a personification of the period’s ideal of beauty. The clinging or partly transparent garments give us more than an intimation of the sweetness that could be found in the closed world of the harem.

Glass Bottle

India (Gujarat), Mughal, first half of the 18th century

Glass (mold-blown), enamel, and gilt

Gilding and enameling were the most popular form of decorating glass in the eighteenth century, and the most common form was a square-shaped bottle, called a “case bottle” because of its similarity to European transport bottles made to fit in wooden cases. In fact, many case bottles were actually made in Europe and later painted in India. They were usually decorated with floral motifs on two sides, and with figural scenes similar in style and subject matter to contemporary paintings on the other two sides.

Great Indian Fruit Bat
Attributed to Bhawani Das
India (Kolkata), Colonial British, c. 1777 - 1782
Pencil, ink, and opaque watercolors on paper

This watercolor belongs to the larger tradition of Company painting, or works made by Indian artists for English patrons (usually employees of the East India Company, hence the name of the school). Its anonymous artist is believed to have been in the circle of painters who worked for Sir Elijah Impey, Chief Justice of Bengal from 1774 to 1782, and his wife. They collected specimens of Indian flora and fauna at their estate in Calcutta and commissioned local artists to portray them. Although originally intended as a scientific record, the Impey natural studies are considered among the strongest achievements of the Company School.

Great Indian Fruit Bat

Attributed to Bhawani Das

India (Kolkata), Colonial British, c. 1777 - 1782

Pencil, ink, and opaque watercolors on paper

This watercolor belongs to the larger tradition of Company painting, or works made by Indian artists for English patrons (usually employees of the East India Company, hence the name of the school). Its anonymous artist is believed to have been in the circle of painters who worked for Sir Elijah Impey, Chief Justice of Bengal from 1774 to 1782, and his wife. They collected specimens of Indian flora and fauna at their estate in Calcutta and commissioned local artists to portray them. Although originally intended as a scientific record, the Impey natural studies are considered among the strongest achievements of the Company School.

Basin with Stylized Lotus Blossoms
India, Mughal, 17th century
Marble

Lyrical patterns of stylized lotus blossoms flanked by leaf forms comprise the upper and lower bands of this nearly square marble basin. The profile of the basin itself suggests the shape of an opening lotus bud. These motifs recall monuments commissioned by the emperor Jahangir (r. 1605–27) and his son Shah Jahan (r. 1628–58), whose floral style was popular throughout northern India, in both the Mughal and Rajput realms.

Basin with Stylized Lotus Blossoms

India, Mughal, 17th century

Marble

Lyrical patterns of stylized lotus blossoms flanked by leaf forms comprise the upper and lower bands of this nearly square marble basin. The profile of the basin itself suggests the shape of an opening lotus bud. These motifs recall monuments commissioned by the emperor Jahangir (r. 1605–27) and his son Shah Jahan (r. 1628–58), whose floral style was popular throughout northern India, in both the Mughal and Rajput realms.